Plant fossil in rock

Plant fossil in rock from Motunau beach. Another image below.

Can anyone help me identify this plant fossil visible on the surface of this rock?  Research has not helped. I am just curious as to what the plant may be and which geological era it comes from. It would be great to find out!

The rock has been in my studio and unfortunately was splashed with ink and paint, so ignore the grey and yellow marks – the fossil appears in the pale grey markings. One of the leaves (?) bottom left is quite visible.


I brought the rock home as I was interested in the sea creature holes on the other side, and only later noticed the markings when I tried to remove the grey circles and the yellow stain.


The rock comes from Motunau beach north of Christchurch, and I attach some information from a really useful book for the uninitiated about the geology of the area which comes from the “Field Guide to NZ Geology” by Jocelyn Thornton.

Another image of the rock, adjusted to increase visibility of the fossil

14 Day Challenge

Being pushed to take risks is one way to new creativity. I am enjoying this Skillshare class “Fearless Art Challenge” by Marie-Noelle Wurm.

This image using oil pastels (which defeated me badly in the past) was again attempted in the two day prompt – Metamorphosis I and II – for days 5 and 6.

Most recently this has been my attempt at Day 8’s “Colours and More Colours”. I used my own handmade paint – Indigo from pigment powder, a local rock pigment powder that was rubbed on to the paper, and Okains Bay watercolour paint.

Love the streak of indigo in the brown pigment.

Day 9 coming up…

Making Paint at Turanga – Christchurch City Libraries

I am super excited to be showing how to make paint at the Turanga library next Sunday 13 January.

There will be a demonstration in the morning for children, and the workshop for adults in the afternoon.

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LOCALity

I took part in this exhibition, and showed some of my paintings made with ink from empty seed pods from Harakeke (NZ flax plant).  I also held a paintmaking workshop.

Here is the published information:

Last days for the exhibition LOCALity at Arts in Oxford, 72 Main St, Oxford. Exhibition closes Tues 10 July 2018.

LOCALity: a group exhibition exploring location, materiality & positioning

Arts in Oxford is pleased to present a selection of artworks by Canterbury artists Mark Adams, Mike Boot, Tony Bond, Cheryl Lucas, Elfi Spiewack, Tessa Warburton and Celia Wilson.

Artists each have diverse, unique practices but collectively are themes of rural life that connect all the works. Local geology, farming industry, water issues, native and introduced flora, recycling, repurposing are all reflected in this curated exhibition.

Images by Arts In Oxford.

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(You can just see my artworks on the wall in this photo above.)

Press Release:

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LOCALITY JUNE-JULYLOCALITY JUNE-JULY

Printmaking Workshop

Colours of Canterbury and other places, made at this morning’s printmaking workshop at Arts in Oxford Gallery.  Many thanks to Jo who made these lovely paints.

 

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Paintmaking Workshop

 

I am holding a paintmaking workshop on Saturday 23rd June.  If you are interested please book at the gallery to reserve a place.

We are also holding two other workshops to accompany the exhibition LOCALity now on show at Arts in Oxford, North Canterbury.

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Seeds, hips and twigs

I completed a Skillshare course on botanical sketching by Laura Ashton, and was really pleased to get a few tips that really helped!  So pleased to find a use for some of my dried plant material.

 

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Wrybills

Been a while since I have posted, but I have been otherwise occupied with the gallery at Arts in Oxford.

No painting, no prints, no solar dyes.   Well, actually, I have done some on the odd occasion, and I had to do some mono prints for the exhibition “From the Rivers to the Shore” which was on at the gallery from 10 June for five weeks.  The show is now on at The Depot Artspace in Devonport, Auckland.  From there it will go up to the Hokianga, at Rawene,  in No 1 Parnell Gallery.

I was delighted to sell the work I exhibited in Oxford North Canterbury, which is this one below.  Wyrbills are the only bird on the planet with a bill that bends to the right – it is endangered due to habitat loss on the braided rivers of the South Island of New Zealand, where this species breeds, and on the distant shores it visits during its annual migration to overwinter in warmer climes.  It is also endangered due to predators and weed invasion of the bare rock covered areas of the braided rivers where the eggs are laid amongst the rocks.  In conjunction with Braided River Aid, the gallery hosted a panel discussion with two Canterbury University academics from the Biological Sciences department who are researching nearly everything you can think of to help these and other endangered birds.

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The rocks are coloured with pigments from the river rocks.  You can see the curve of the bill in this sketch below!

 

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